Tag Archives: Hyperallergic

A Compendium of Shakespeare’s Plants, from Juliet’s Rose to Ophelia’s Bouquet

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***Shakespeare for the Joy of It Series: Shakespeare’s Botanicals***

Brought to You by My Curated Information Blog, Create & Be Well

Courtesy of The British Museum

          We are coming up to the annual celebration of Shakespeare’s birthday on April 24. I thought this would be an appropriate time to share this lovely volume on the plants in Shakespeare’s plays. Botanical Shakespeare is a wonderful gift for yourself or someone else who appreciates both Shakespeare and botanical art. Thanks to Hyperallergic for the essay.

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Source: A Compendium of Shakespeare’s Plants, from Juliet’s Rose to Ophelia’s Bouquet

Courtesy of the British Museum

Courtesy of the British Museum

The Creative Apothecary Loves the Flowers in Shakespeare’s Plays!

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Reboot with the Ancient Japanese Calendar of 72 Microseasons

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Tiny Seasons for Shaping Your Days (Or Create Your Own Microseasons)

Brought to You by My Curated Information Blog, Create & Be Well

Anthurium in the Snow Series 2016 Copyright Regina MJ Kyle

Anthurium in the Snow Series 2016
Copyright Regina MJ Kyle

 

         This article is interesting, inspiring, and a new way of looking at the seasons of the year, the seasons of life. Explore the essay, think of its implications, perhaps download the app to follow this Japanese treasure. Or you might want to begin your own year of microseasons.  Thanks to Hyperallergic amd Claire Voon for this gift of ideas.

          The images are all from my photography/digital image series from last winter in Massachusetts.

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“Forget summer and spring; bring on the season of “The Bear Retreats to its Den.””

Source: Reboot with the Ancient Japanese Calendar of 72 Microseasons

Ice Patterns Winter 2016 Copyright Regina MJ Kyle

Ice Patterns Winter 2016
Copyright Regina MJ Kyle

White on White, Winter Series 2016 Copyright Regina MJ Kyle

White on White, Winter Series 2016
Copyright Regina MJ Kyle

The Creative Apothecary Celebrates the Tiny Seasons of the Year!

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Before Google Earth: A Rare Cartographic Compendium From Renaissance Europe

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For the Map Freaks Among Us, Some Renaissance City Views:

Brought to You by My Curated Information Blog, Create & Be Well

Casa Batilo, Barcelona Courtesy of design-dautore magazine

Casa Batilo, Barcelona
Courtesy of design-dautore magazine

          Every so often I share an interesting find from the wonderful world of maps. Mapping is one of the most fascinating of human endeavors and the detailed, artistic maps of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance offer insight into the human ingenuity and imagination.You can get a modern edition of Cities of the World from Taschen. Kudos to Hyperallergic for sharing the story of this treasure.

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“Long before the ubiquity of Google Maps, these colorful engravings, produced between 1572 and 1617, comprised the world’s most accurate and elaborate collection of urban cartography ever made.”

Source: Before Google Earth: A Rare Cartographic Compendium From Renaissance Europe

Casa Batilo, Barcelona Courtesy of design-dautore magazine

Casa Batilo, Barcelona
Courtesy of design-dautore magazine

Casa Batilo, Barcelona Courtesy of design-dautore magazine

Casa Batilo, Barcelona
Courtesy of design-dautore magazine

The Creative Apothecary Loves the Art/Science of Map Making!

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The First Woman Photographer Captured the Elegance of Algae

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Natural Beauty in Blue, Pioneering Woman Photographer:

Brought to You by Your Curated Information Blog, Create & Be Well

Courtesy of Iris Grace Painting

Courtesy of Iris Grace Painting

     This is a share for the sheer beauty of it, something I try to do every weekend. As a longtime photographer, I am endlessly fascinated by the work of its early pioneers. In the late 19th century Anna Atkins published the first photography collection, images of British algae, using the cyanotype process. The images are simple, engaging, and unforgettable. Thanks to Hyperallergic, one of my favorite resources, Allison Meier, and the New York Public Library for making the images public.

     The images on the post, all predominantly blue, are paintings by Iris Grace Halmshaw, Monet, and a photograph/digital painting from my new Crocus Variations Series. Revel in the power of blue.

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“Algae is graceful and light in the ocean, swaying with the waves like hair in the wind.”

Source: The First Woman Photographer Captured the Elegance of Algae

Courtesy of Monet's Palate

Courtesy of Monet’s Palate

Crocus Variations 1 Copyright 2016 Regina MJ Kyle

Crocus Variations 1
Copyright 2016 Regina MJ Kyle

The Creative Apothecary Celebrates the Power and Beauty of Blue!

 

An Acoustic Museum of Byzantine Sound

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Built for Sound to Envelop Us, the Byzantine Church:

Brought to You by Your Curated Information Blog, Create & Be Well

Dale Chihuly, Photograph by Barbara Fitos

Dale Chihuly, Photograph by Barbara Fitos

      Sound has profound impacts on us: its loudness and softness, its rhythms, its power to penetrate our very bones, make us happy, chill us out, instill awe, induce us to dance. One of the recurring themes in my book in progress, “Shaping Lives, Transforming Communities: Creative Expression in the Dance of Life,” is the healing power of music. Perhaps I should expand that to be more inclusive of all sound.

     Certain structures are built to precise acoustic specifications; one of the acid tests of a new concert hall is the purity with which it transmits sound. Early churches were built with sound in mind; music was an essential part of ceremonies; the experience was meant to be immersive. This very informative article from Hyperallergic includes the podcast from the University of Southern California’s Escape Velocity that demonstrates the results of the acoustic archaeology explorations recently done in the Byzantine churches of Thessaloniki. Kudos to Hyperallergic for this share.

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“The sonic intentions of architecture are often lost over the centuries. In 2014, a team of researchers investigated the acoustics of Byzantine churches in Thessaloniki, Greece, …”

Source: An Acoustic Museum of Byzantine Sound

Courtesy of Dale Chihuly

Courtesy of Dale Chihuly

Dale Chihuly, Photograph by Barbara Fitos

Dale Chihuly, Photograph by Barbara Fitos

The Creative Apothecary Celebrates the Immersive Power of Sound!

 

 

 

Rethinking Architecture After Catastrophe

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How We Rebuild Communities after Catastrophe, Responding with  Design:

Brought to You by Your Curated Information Blog, Create & Be Well

Havana, Courtesy of design-dautore magazine

Havana, Courtesy of design-dautore magazine

     Over the next several days I will be posting a series on placemaking, how we make our communities places that shelter, inspire, and bring joy to the people who live in them. Places are–and must be–for people.

     Catastrophes occur in all communities, past and present. Whether we look at the Great Fire of London, Hurricane Sandy, or the earthquakes in Nepal architects and others who shape our communities must respond. The current exhibition at the Royal Institute of British Architects, Creation from Catastrophe, is well worth a visit and a close look. Thanks to Hypoallergic and Claire Voon for sharing it with us.

     The images on this blog are of Havana, Cuba and come courtesy of design-dautore magazine.

Read…View…Reflect…Share…How Has Your Community Responded to Catastrophe?

“From London’s Great Fire of 1666 to the Nepal earthquake, Creation from Catastrophe focuses on a number of the world’s most destructive events through our history, exploring the designs…”

Source: Rethinking Architecture After Catastrophe

Havana, Courtesy of design-dautore magazine

Havana, Courtesy of design-dautore magazine

Havana, Courtesy of design-dautore magazine

Havana, Courtesy of design-dautore magazine

The Creative Apothecary Celebrates Great Design and Design Thinking!

Boston Builds an Artist-in-Residence Program, Bringing Creativity to City Hall

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The Arts Are Important in Building a Community Series, The Boston Approach:

Brought to You by Your Curated Information Blog, Create & Be Well

Courtesy of Monet's Palate

Courtesy of Monet’s Palate

  Boston is first in a series of posts on the arts in community development;

Paducah, Kentucky will be the next community in the series.

     We should not underestimate the importance of the arts in developing communities. The arts are deep drivers of the economy; they become instruments of healing and transformation in times of trauma; they are essential in the healthy development of children’s lives. The multiple roles of the arts in our communities is a central theme of my book in progress, “Shaping Lives, Transforming Communities: Creative Expression in the Dance of Life.”

     Boston is a city rich in all areas of the arts. Mayor Walsh has added an arts and culture department to his cabinet and an extensive planning process for arts in the community is in its initial stages. This post from Hyperallergic offers a thoughtful and detailed introduction to what is happening in Boston and to one major aspect of new directions, the city’s Artist- in- Residence Program.

     The images in this post are courtesy of Monet’s Palate, a great new cookbook from Giverny.

Read…View…Reflect…Share…Support All the Arts in Community Development!

“BOSTON — It’s snowing hard outside, and it’s a Saturday, but the second-floor hallway of the city’s newest municipal building — its school department headquarters — is filled with…”

Source: Boston Builds an Artist-in-Residence Program, Bringing Creativity to City Hall

Courtesy of Monet's Palate

Courtesy of Monet’s Palate

Courtesy of Monet's Palate

Courtesy of Monet’s Palate

The Creative Apothecary Believes in the Power of the Arts to Transform Communities!

A Radiologist’s X-Ray Photographs of Flowers from the 1930s

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A Feast for the Eyes, the Anatomy of Flowers plus Shakespearean Thoughts for a Winter’s Day:

Brought to You by Your Curated Information Blog, Create & Be Well

Courtesy of the Folger Shakespeare Library

Courtesy of the Folger Shakespeare Library

     We are endlessly creative in finding new ways to express the artist in us. Many of us photography as a means of showing the essence of the world around us. For some in the medical profession the x-ray machine offers a new way of seeing and understanding the beauties of nature.

     The very perceptive Claire Voon of Hyperallergic reports on the work of 1930s radiologist Dr. Dain L. Tasker, on exhibition at the Joseph Bellows Gallery in La Jolla until mid-February. Dr. Tasker was a pioneer in botanical art, using the x-ray machine to reveal the essential structure of plants. The images, in all the tones from white through endless grays to deepest black, are haunting in their poetic elusiveness.

     For this post i have twinned the anatomy of flowers with tidbits from Shakespeare, courtesy of the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Read…View…Reflect…Share…Find New Ways to Create Your World Today!

“When we think of X-rays, we generally think of the human body’s skeletal structure, but in the 1930s, one osteopathist turned his attention to the anatomy of plants and used his X-ray machine…”

Source: A Radiologist’s X-Ray Photographs of Flowers from the 1930s

Courtesy of the Folger Shakespeare Library

Courtesy of the Folger Shakespeare Library

Courtesy of the Folger Shakespeare Library

Courtesy of the Folger Shakespeare Library

The Creative Apothecary Loves the Folger, Shakespeare, and Creative Use of Everyday Instruments!

The Delicate and Daring Works of a Forgotten 17th-Century Japanese Painter

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A Japanese Painter You Need to Know and Images from Monet:

Brought to You by Your Curated Information Blog, Create & Be Well

Courtesy of Monet's Palate

Courtesy of Monet’s Palate

   Something old and unknown, something newer and most familiar…to you. Today’s post introduces you to a 17th century Japanese painter and brings familiar images from one of my favorite artists, Claude Monet. A combined feast for the eyes and the mind.

   For our Japanese painter we turn, as we so often do, to Hyperallergic and Claire Voon’s review of Sotatsu: Making Waves at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington, DC. Tamaraya Sotatsu was a 17th century Japanese painter with his studio in Kyoto, my favorite Japanese city. I was unaware of his work until I saw this essay. The works are stunningly beautiful, even from just the photographs on the printed page. The exhibit continues only until January 31, so get there soon if you are in the area.

   The images in the blog are, of course, the work of Claude Monet, courtesy of that wonderful new cookbook, Monet’s Palate.

Read…View…Reflect…Share…Wonder at the Beauty of Sotatsu and Monet!

“WASHINGTON, DC — Over the course of his career in the 17th century, the Japanese painter Tawaraya Sōtatsu produced a large body of intricate and decorative works on paper.”

Source: The Delicate and Daring Works of a Forgotten 17th-Century Japanese Painter

Courtesy of Monet's Palate

Courtesy of Monet’s Palate

Courtesy of Monet's Palate

Courtesy of Monet’s Palate

The Creative Apothecary Loves the Work of Monet and Sotatsu!

Rhode Island’s Newest Gallery Champions Artists With Disabilities

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New Gallery in Providence RI 2 and More on Artists with Disabilities:

Brought to You by Your Curated Information Blog, Create & Be Well

Courtesy of Iris Grace Paintings

Courtesy of Iris Grace Painting

The new gallery for artists with disabilities in Providence offers the opportunity for a more extended look at the role of the arts in healing and transformation. The revolution in healthcare that is integrating the arts into a model for wellness is a major theme in my book in progress Shaping Lives, Transforming Communities: Creative Expression in the Dance of Life.

Inner Space Outsider Art Gallery and Store in Providence is making the art of persons with disabilities more visible and available to the public. Today’s second post on the topic, from Hyperallergic,  presents a more detailed introduction to the gallery and its artists, as well as a brief overview and links to other information about “outsider” art. The gallery’s founders, Dana and Josh Kretzmann–both practicing artists, worked for many years with adults with developmental disabilities.

The images in this post are from paintings by Iris Grace, a young British painter who is autistic and whose home education by her mother is followed by thousands around the world. http://www.irisgracepainting.com

Read…View…Reflect…Share…Support Art for People with Disabilities in Your Community!

“The term “Outsider Art,” coined in 1972 by writer Roger Cardinal, has plenty of critics.”

Source: Rhode Island’s Newest Gallery Champions Artists With Disabilities

Courtesy of Iris Grace Paintings

Courtesy of Iris Grace Painting

Courtesy of iris Grace Painting

Courtesy of iris Grace Painting